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Safety at Workplace: Why We Manage Health and Safety?

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Safety at Workplace: Why We Manage Health and Safety?

What is Safety?

Safety is the state of being "safe" (from French sauf), the condition of being protected from harm or other non-desirable outcomes. Safety can also refer to the control of recognized hazards in order to achieve an acceptable level of risk. Safety is a relative concept and depends on perspective. It can apply to general conditions or specific situations. It can also be classified in terms of being physical, psychological, financial, or occupational.

For example, safety is often considered to refer to the controls that are used to protect workers in a hazard-filled environment, such as the use of personal protective equipment, work procedures, and training.

What is Health?

Health is the state of being "healthy" (from French santé), the condition of being free from illness or injury. Health can also refer to the overall well-being of an individual, including their physical, mental, and emotional state.

For example, health is often considered to refer to the absence of disease or injury, but it can also include the presence of good physical and mental health, as well as the ability to lead a fulfilling and satisfying life.

It is important to note that health is not just the absence of disease or injury, but a state of overall well-being.

This means that good health includes both physical and mental health, as well as the ability to lead a fulfilling and satisfying life. There are many factors that contribute to good health, including genetics, lifestyle choices, and access to healthcare.

What is Occupational Safety and Health?

Occupational safety and health (OSH), also commonly referred to as occupational health and safety (OHS), is the area of public health that focuses on the prevention of workplace injuries, illnesses, and fatalities.

OSH also encompasses the promotion of safe and healthy working conditions. OSH programs are designed to protect workers from risks associated with their job tasks, as well as to ensure that workers have the knowledge and skills necessary to perform their job tasks safely.

OSH programs typically include a combination of regulatory requirements, voluntary standards, and educational and training resources. Common OSH program elements include hazard identification and assessment, control measures, employee training, and recordkeeping.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is the primary federal agency responsible for regulating workplace safety in the United States. OSHA develops and enforces standards, provides training and assistance and oversees the development of state-level OSH programs.

In many cases, states have their own occupational safety and health agencies that operate under authority delegated by OSHA. State-level OSH agencies are typically responsible for enforcing state occupational safety and health laws and regulations.

The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSH Act) is the primary federal law governing workplace safety in the United States. The OSH Act establishes a framework for protecting workers from job-related risks. The Act requires employers to provide a safe and healthful workplace for their employees and requires employees to comply with safety and health rules and regulations.

The OSH Act also established the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) as the primary federal agency responsible for regulating workplace safety.

The primary goals of the OSH Act are to prevent job-related injuries, illnesses, and fatalities; to promote safe and healthful working conditions, and to provide for fair and effective enforcement of the Act.

The OSH Act covers all employers and employees in the United States, regardless of size or industry type. However, there are some exceptions, such as certain industries that are regulated by other federal agencies, such as the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

There are also some states that have their own occupational safety and health laws and regulations that cover state and local government employees. These state plans must be at least as effective as the federal OSHA program in protecting workers.

Why We Manage Health and Safety

Reasons to manage health and safety can be categorized into the following:

Moral Reasons

No one wants to see their employees getting hurt or worse, and a strong health and safety policy can help to prevent accidents from happening. But beyond that, there is a moral imperative for employers to protect their workers.

After all, these are people who have chosen to come and work for you, and it is your duty to ensure that they are safe while they are doing so. If something does go wrong, and an employee is injured or killed, the emotional impact on their family and friends can be devastating.

So, while there may be financial costs associated with implementing and maintaining a good health and safety policy, the moral case for doing so is even stronger.

The moral reason is all about protecting the people who work hard every day. Every person has a duty to others, and when they go into an environment where there's potential for danger or harm it feels wrong not only physically but also mentally as well because you are putting your own wants before someone else’s needs

Workers expect that at some point during their shift everything will stop being done on behalf of them--they're looking forward to coming home after completing another successful task without any concerns outside what awaits ahead; however, this does not always happen due to large part thanks largely based off how much effort everyone invested into ensuring each worker's safety.

It is said that history repeats itself. Unfortunately, this is often true when it comes to workplace accidents. Many tragedies have occurred over the years due to negligence and a lack of safety measures in the workplace.

While some companies may view health and safety as an unnecessary expense, the moral reasons to manage these risks should be enough to convince any business owner to take action. Here are two moral reasons to prioritize health and safety in the workplace:

To Protect Your Employees

Your employees are your most valuable asset. Without them, your business would not be able to function. This is why it is your safety responsibility to protect them from harm.

If an employee is injured or becomes ill due to a preventable workplace hazard, it is your company that will be held responsible. Not only could you be facing a lawsuit, but you would also have to live with the knowledge that your negligence allowed one of your employees to get hurt.

To Avoid Tragedy

No one wants to be responsible for a workplace tragedy. The thought of something awful happening to one of your employees because you failed to take proper safety precautions is unbearable.

Unfortunately, accidents do happen. But if you have taken the necessary steps to reduce the risks in your workplace, then you will be able to sleep better at night knowing that you did everything you could to avoid a tragedy.

Families may never be the same after losing a loved one in a workplace accident, and companies may be forced to shut down if they are held liable for the injuries or fatalities.

No one wants to be responsible for something like this happening. But unfortunately, accidents do happen. This is why it is so important for companies to take the necessary steps to reduce the risks in their workplaces.

Disease

There are many people who have died from work-related illnesses. In some cases, these deaths may be attributed to poor occupational safety standards in the past that existed before implementing modern-day practices and regulations were put into place; however, most often it's because they did not receive adequate training on how best to maintain their health during busy shift schedules with little free time offsite between shifts or when taking days off altogether due lack thereof.

The industries having higher rates than average include healthcare providers such as doctor's offices where patients come regularly so there is always someone available should one need immediate attention--this also includes clinics. So this is another moral reason that we should manage health and safety in the workplace.

There are many moral reasons why employers should manage health and safety at the workplace. The most important reason is to protect workers from suffering injury or ill health.

Around 1 in every 200 Australian workers was seriously injured at work in 2015-16, while more than 60 workers were killed.

Work-related stress and musculoskeletal disorders are the largest causes of work-related ill-health. Each year, 400,000 workers suffer from stress-related ill-health, and 50% of those workers have suffered for one year or longer. Additionally, 400,000 workers suffer from musculoskeletal disorders (mainly back pain and upper limb disorders). 60% of those workers suffer for one year or longer.

Injury and ill-health not only cause physical pain and suffering, but they also impose significant financial costs on workers and their families. In addition to the direct costs of medical treatment, there are indirect costs such as lost earnings and productivity.

Workers who suffer from long-term stress or musculoskeletal disorders may never be able to return to work, which can have a devastating impact on their lives.

Employers have a moral responsibility to protect workers from suffering injury or ill health. By managing health and safety at the workplace, employers can help to ensure that workers are safe and healthy and that their families are not burdened with the financial costs of a workplace injury or ill health.

Legal Reasons

Employers have a legal responsibility to provide a safe and healthy workplace for their employees and to consult with them on health and safety matters. This is set out in the Occupational Safety and Health Act 1984 (the OSH Act).

The Act requires employers to:

  • provide and maintain a safe working environment
  • provide and maintain safe systems of work
  • ensure plant and equipment is safe and without risks to health
  • provide information, training and supervision to ensure employees are aware of risks to their health and safety
  • consult with employees on matters relating to their health and safety.

Under the Act, employers must also report certain work-related injuries and hazards and notify WorkSafe of certain notifiable incidents.

Employers have a legal duty to provide a safe and healthful workplace for their employees. This duty is set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSH Act).

The OSH Act establishes a federal mandate for workplace safety and health and sets forth the responsibilities of employers and employees in creating a safe and healthful workplace.

There are many legal reasons why employers need to manage health and safety in the workplace. The primary reason is to protect employees from harm. However, there are also other compelling reasons such as protecting the employer from liability in case of an accident, reducing workers' compensation costs, and avoiding OSHA fines.

The law requires employers to take reasonable steps to protect employees from risks arising from their work. This includes taking action to prevent hazards from becoming potential sources of harm, and implementing effective systems of work to minimize the likelihood of harm occurring.

Employers have a legal duty to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare of all their employees. This includes protecting employees from risks to their health and safety arising from the work that they do.

Other legal reasons for managing health and safety in the workplace include:

  • To comply with health and safety legislation
  • To avoid costly health and safety prosecutions
  • To reduce the amount of time lost through injury and ill-health
  • To improve morale and motivation among employees
  • To protect members of the public from being injured or harassed in the workplace
  • To safeguard company property and equipment from damage or destruction
  • To reduce the risk of liability claims being made against the company
  • To comply with insurance requirements.
  • To protect the environment from damage or pollution arising from the work that is carried out.
  • To improve the company's image and reputation.

There are many benefits to be gained from managing health and safety in the workplace effectively. By taking steps to ensure that employees are safe and healthy, employers can avoid the costs and disruption that are associated with accidents and ill health. There is also evidence to suggest that companies that manage health and safety well tend to be more productive and efficient than those which do not.

As discussed above, one of the key legal reasons to manage health and safety at the workplace is to comply with OSHA regulations. If a company does not comply with OSHA regulations, it can be fined or even shut down.

Finally, managing health and safety can help a company avoid liability in the event of an accident or injury. If an employee is injured at work, the company could be held liable if it is found that the accident could have been prevented with better health and safety management. By managing health and safety properly, companies can protect themselves from potential legal problems.

To get a license to operate a company, there are laws that an employer must follow. If they do not manage health and safety properly then it will be impossible for their operations to take place

The best way of avoiding these problems is by making sure your business has all its papers in order from start-up until retirement so you're never caught off guard when things go wrong.

Your business may be subject to legal action if you do not take adequate steps to manage health and safety in the workplace. This can include enforcement actions by government agencies or prosecution by the courts.

There are a number of federal, state, and local laws that set out minimum standards for health and safety in the workplace. These laws require employers to take steps to protect workers from risks to their health and safety.

If you do not comply with these laws, you may be subject to enforcement action by government agencies or prosecution by the courts.

Enforcement action can include on-the-spot fines, improvement notices, and prohibition notices. The prosecution can lead to fines and, in some cases, imprisonment.

Compliance with health and safety laws is not optional - it is a legal requirement. Failing to comply can have serious consequences for your business.

The cost of a data breach is one thing, but the real punishment comes in how you're punished. If your organization isn't prepared to manage health and safety properly then they could face Punitive damages where criminal prosecution due to breaches of legal duty may result fine for organizations or imprisonment/fine for both individuals.

The compensation effect of law means that employees can sue in civil courts for damages if they were due to come into contact with negligence on behalf of their employer. This also provides a reason as to why managing health and safety is so important since it benefits everyone involved!

Financial Reasons

When considering the costs of accidents and ill-health, it is important to take into account both the direct and indirect costs. The direct costs include things like medical expenses and property damage, while indirect costs can be much more difficult to quantify. Indirect costs can include lost productivity, absenteeism, legal fees, and insurance premiums.

The business case for health and safety

The business case for health and safety is centered on the potential costs of poor standards of health and safety. Fines in excess of £250,000 and even higher levels of compensation payments are not uncommon. As mentioned earlier, the costs may be direct or indirect and insured or uninsured. Some examples of these follow.

Direct Costs

These are costs that are directly related to the accident and may be insured or uninsured. 

Insured direct costs normally include:

  • claims on employers and public liability insurance;
  • damage to buildings, equipment or vehicles;
  • any attributable production and/or general business loss;
  • the absence of employees.

Uninsured direct costs include: 

  • fines resulting from prosecution by the enforcement authority;
  • sick pay;
  • some damage to product, equipment, vehicles or process not directly attributable to the accident (e.g. caused by replacement staff);
  • increases in insurance premiums resulting from the accident;
  • any compensation not covered by the insurance policy due to an excess agreed between the employer and the insurance company;
  • legal representation following any compensation claim.

Indirect costs

These are costs that may not be directly attributable to the accident but may result from a series of accidents. Again these may be insured or uninsured.

Insured indirect costs include: 

  • a cumulative business loss;
  • product or process liability claims;
  • recruitment of replacement staff.

Uninsured indirect costs include: 

  • loss of goodwill and a poor corporate image;
  • accident investigation time and any subsequent remedial action required;
  • production delays;
  • extra overtime payments;
  • lost time for other employees, such as a first-aider, who tend to the needs of the injured person;
  • the recruitment and training of replacement staff;
  • additional administration time incurred;
  • first-aid provision and training;
  • lower employee morale possibly leading to reduced productivity

Some of these items, such as business loss, may be uninsurable or too prohibitively expensive to insure. Therefore, insurance policies can never cover all of the costs of an accident or disease because either some items are not covered by the policy or the insurance excess is greater than the particular item's cost.

Safety At Workplace

In a study undertaken by the UK Health and Safety Executive (HSE), it was shown that indirect costs can be up to 36 times greater than direct costs. This means that the true cost of an accident or disease is much greater than the initial direct costs.

By managing health and safety at the workplace, businesses can reduce the chance of accidents and ill-health occurring. This will help to reduce both the direct and indirect costs associated with workplace accidents and illnesses. Therefore, managing health and safety is not only important for the well-being of employees but is also vital for the financial bottom line of the business.

Workplace injuries can have a significant impact on businesses, including lost productivity, increased workers’ compensation costs and damage to equipment and property. In serious cases, they can also result in fines or jail sentences.

In 2015-16, there were $61.8 billion in estimated economic costs associated with workplace injuries and diseases in Australia. This includes the cost of health care, absenteeism, workers’ compensation and loss of productivity.

Each year, as discussed above 400,000 workers suffer from stress-related ill-health resulting in 10 million lost workdays each year.

Additionally, 400,000 workers suffer from musculoskeletal disorders causing 7 million lost workdays each year.

This is why it’s so important for employers to have systems and processes in place to identify and manage risks, and to ensure their employees are properly trained and supervised.

Investing in workplace safety and health can help businesses control costs associated with workplace injuries and illnesses, and improve productivity and profitability.

Workplace injuries and illnesses can lead to lost wages, productivity, and income; increased healthcare costs; and decreased quality of life. Fatalities can result in the loss of a breadwinner or primary caregiver, leaving families struggling to make ends meet.

Businesses may face higher insurance premiums, workers’ compensation costs, and productivity losses. And economies may suffer from the loss of workers’ skills and experience.

Safe workplaces are good for business. They help businesses control costs associated with workplace injuries and illnesses, and they improve productivity and profitability.

When workers are healthy and safe, businesses benefit from increased morale and motivation, reduced absenteeism, and improved retention.

Investing in workplace safety and health can help businesses create a culture of safety that can prevent injuries, illnesses, and fatalities; improve productivity, and protect workers’ rights.

There are also good business reasons for managing health and safety in the workplace. A well-run operation with a good health and safety record will be more efficient and productive and will have lower insurance premiums.

When workers feel safe and comfortable in their environment, they are more likely to be engaged and motivated, which leads to better performance and increased productivity.

And when employers consult with their employees on health and safety matters, they are more likely to develop a good understanding of the risks in the workplace and how best to manage them. This can only lead to a safer and more efficient workplace.

Health and safety should be a priority for any employer, not only to avoid legal penalties but also because it is the right thing to do. Workers should be able to come to their job and expect that everything has been done to ensure their safety. A well-run operation with a good health and safety record will be more efficient and productive and will have lower insurance premiums.

Consultation with employees on health and safety matters is essential to identify and manage risks in the workplace. When workers feel safe and comfortable in their environment, they are more likely to be engaged and motivated, which leads to better performance and increased productivity.

Psychological Safety At Work

Psychological safety is the belief that one will not be punished or humiliated for taking risks in the workplace. It is a key ingredient of successful teams and organizations and has been shown to improve work performance, creativity, and innovation.

Creating a psychologically safe environment at work starts with leaders setting the tone and example for how employees should interact with each other. Leaders need to be clear about their expectations for behavior and make it safe for employees to speak up and challenge the status quo. They also need to provide employees with the resources and support they need to do their jobs well.

When leaders create a psychologically safe environment, employees feel more comfortable taking risks, speaking up, and sharing ideas. This leads to better work performance, creativity, and innovation.

So how can you create a psychologically safe environment at work? Here are some tips:

  • Set the tone and example for how employees should interact with each other.
  • Be clear about your expectations for behavior.
  • Make it safe for employees to speak up and challenge the status quo.
  • Provide employees with the resources and support they need to do their jobs well.
  • Encourage open communication and collaboration.
  • Foster a culture of trust and respect.
  • Support employees when they make mistakes.
  • Celebrate successes and progress.

Leaders play a critical role in creating a psychologically safe environment at work. By setting the tone and example for how employees should interact with each other, being clear about their expectations for behavior, and making it safe for employees to speak up and challenge the status quo, leaders can create an environment that fosters creativity, innovation, and success.

10 Important Safety Tips You Should Follow

  • Know the risks in your workplace.
  • Understand the importance of personal protective equipment (PPE).
  • Be aware of potential hazards.
  • Report any unsafe conditions to your supervisor immediately.
  • Follow all safety rules and regulations.
  • Attend all safety training sessions.
  • Participate in regular safety audits and inspections.
  • Use proper lifting techniques.
  • Be cautious when working with chemicals and other dangerous materials.
  • Never take shortcuts when it comes to safety.

Conclusion

Having a well-implemented health and safety management system can help protect your employees while limiting your company's liability in the event of an accident or injury. If you're looking for more information on how to create or improve your own workplace health and safety program, be sure to check out our other blog posts on this topic

Safety First

Safety First

Our team of highly skilled professionals has more than 10 years of experience, and we constantly strive to stay up-to-date on the latest safety information on risks, hazards, and control measures. Our mission is to reduce accidents and injuries around the globe.